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Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:12 pm
by perrandy
here's another review..http://ps3.gamezone.com/gzreviews/r38111.htm
right now i have the impulse to cancel my pre-order but i think i'm gonna still get it cuz there's no alternative for me.yeah, i could buy star ocean or still playing the online part of white knight chronicles.but, the problem here is that i dislike the star ocean franchise and for white knight...well, now that i have finished the game there's no compelling reason to go back to it even if the online portion of the game was better done :roll:

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 3:17 pm
by Varyag
Yup, I'm waiting it in Eu, and also Trinity Universe too =))

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:52 am
by Xixato
Yep me tooooo..but there is no official news of trinity universe for usa or eu... :evil:

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 2:40 pm
by perrandy
yeah i had forgotten about trinity universe.anyways, i just received a call from my local retailer to get my copy tomorrow afternoon ...

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 9:01 am
by Booger
Hello, I am the first person in the Philippines to have my copy of Last Rebellion by NIS America. (Philippines -- you know, world-famous for leaking an early hardware version of the PS3 slim ;) )

I thought that my copy will be region 1 since the region 3 (Asian) version cover art looked the same as the region 2 (Japan) version, except it being printed in Hong Kong. It turns out there's an NIS America logo on the front cover. Which would make this the first NIS America release I have encountered which is not region 1. (There's supposed to be a region 3 dual-audio version of Disgaea 3 using NIS America's localization floating around somewhere but I never encountered it)

It's a shame that one of the few NIS co-productions has received such terrible reviews. I was actually looking forward to this title since last year and the only thing I care about RPGs are its Japanese-ness (so yeah, the dub thing is a minus, but WKC was dubbed only and I can live with that). But what do ya know, I absolutely loved Enchanted Arms, so whatever.

Give me two weeks to complete this game, then I'll link a post of my personal review.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:38 am
by idofgrahf
Bought the game 2 days ago and beat it already. Its actually a pretty short game imo. The battles are kind of hard at the start but it gets very easy at the end. I beat the last boss in under 10 minutes. Magic was useful at the start but toward the end, physical attack deals five to six times the damage than magic. The game is okay, not great but not horrid. The one thing that bugs me the most is the ending. Its...incomplete. No new game plus either so thats a minus for me. All around, it took me about 10-12 hours the beat the game.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sat Feb 27, 2010 6:44 am
by Booger
Hmmm yeah, I noticed there are only a few places and I'm nearing the endgame. I'm stuck at the Tower of Freya though. I can't proceed through the elevator or through the door, I need something but I'm not sure where to get that key. Can anyone clue me in?

Edit: Nvm
Spoiler:
Telest water found in invisible chest on right cliff in front of entrance door; that is Holy Water

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sat Feb 27, 2010 12:59 pm
by Booger
My non-professional review of Last Rebellion

This game is short for a JRPG. I took my time exploring (and doing my laundry) and the entire game only took me 20 hours or 2 sittings. I expected at least 36-40 hours. So the short length is only acceptable if it were a homemade or handheld RPG, which it isn't.

Battle System

From the youtube links it looks clunky, but in actuality it gave me Persona 4 vibes. The whole point of the battle is to maximize your critical attacks. There's nothing more rewarding than seeing five enemies get simultaneously knocked down within 2 turns.

The problem I foresee is that getting that 'pwnage' status requires a lot of trial and error and randomness. Instead of just testing what the enemy's elemental weakness is, in addition you also have to find out what sequence of body parts you have to attack to inflict the maximum damage. Once you get over that (and it could be aggravating at first), the sequence is essentially 'memorized' after you get it right so you just need to follow the prompts the next time you encounter the same enemy. There are no Easy, Medium, Hard modes.

Party System

The party is just two characters that switch back and forth from male to female (kinda like the Birdy anime). While in the field, HP and MP healing is fast, depending on whether you chose female or male. So there is no worry at all about not having a reserve party member with full HP to switch to like you see in other JRPGs.

The limiting factor would be the CP, or Command Points. There are green CP replenishment stations which you can hit to fill up your CP gauge (especially before a boss battle), but while traversing long distances and encountering enemies you tend to run out; that is exactly why you want to maximize your critical hits so you can win the battle in as few turns as possible. During battle, a little CP is replenished; you can also perform the equivalent of "Focus" (for those of you familiar with Skies of Arcadia) to further increase your CP next turn.

The same HP, MP, and CP are shared by the two characters which you switch to and fro. Rather than "1 vs 1", it is more like "2 vs 1-5" and there is a lot of freedom in choosing the order of commands so in the end you don't really feel restricted in only having control of only 2 people. That's because choosing commands is a checkbox system - instead of one command/one attack it is multiple commands/multiple attacks. Just be careful you don't hit 'O' (or 'X' in US PS3s) accidentally since that will cut short your turn.

Levelling

With only one set of stats, this is pretty easy. There's a standard levelling system in addition to extra points you can distribute at your discretion. But what is particularly brilliant is that the extra points used to power up your skills and magic is not permanent! For example, you decide that you want your Fire attack to be stronger and don't need your Heal magic to be that powerful anymore... easy, you remove the point from your Heal magic and add it to your Fire magic.

Graphics

It's late PS2 level graphics. For a better comparison, imagine Enchanted Arms without HDR lighting, that's how basic it is. But what makes it look low-poly is the cel-shading (kind of like
Torchlight in netbook mode). I zoomed in on the character models, and -- besides seeing panties -- the faces were actually nicely detailed, so it isn't the models themselves. The cel-shading just makes things look more jagged than they are. But when supplemented by watercolor sprites, they look consistent enough.

The cutscenes are done in purely visual novel style, which I like. There are a lot of splitscreen event CGs although you probably won't be able to view them in a gallery. The graphic style of the sprites looks more Korean than Japanese - the soft shading, smaller eyes, etc. But I still like what I see.

Environment

It's pretty decent. It's not boring at all, since each area or dungeon is small and compact. Unfortunately, the disc loading screen appears when you switch areas (this game has no option for installation and doesn't require it). It's not a medieval environment, but more like those quasi-Aztec semi-desolate landscapes (the whole religious motif reminded me of the anime Haibane Renmei). The landscape won't win any awards, but it's definitely consistent with the theme of the game.

One gripe I have is that the enemies respawn too quickly. If you don't move, you end up bumping into them again. Also, they are very fast and can chase you halfway across the map. What's worse, they can still be 2 meters away from you when the battle screen starts. Thankfully the 'Surprised' or 'Pre-emptive' modes don't occur too often, but I've noticed some automatic counter-attacks during the actual battles.

Every item in the game is dependent on treasure chests -- whether learning new spells, obtaining keys, accessories, power-ups. Some disappear upon opening, others you can open multiple times. But you need to have keys to open the chests, after which the keys are consumed. Then you need to defeat more monsters to obtain more keys. It was quite frustrating for me during the time I didn't have enough keys to open a chest so I had to kill more monsters then I really needed.

The only NPCs you see are the same hooded entities who only exist to give you hints -- they are scattered throughout the world. They don't give quests or anything. So the whole place seems desolate (dead), but unlike what other people think I really do prefer this lonely atmosphere, since the setting is the remains of a country torn apart by civil war. The level / dungeon designs are really good. They're not the prettiest, but they were more satisfying and less frustrating compared to say, Eternal Sonata. I think the designers knew the limited scope of the game so they designed a nice tight-fitting world with no excess. It's in stark contrast with the wasteful designs of typical MMORPG dungeons.

Sound

Music is sparse, more like ambient sounds. But the few tracks such as title menu and battle music are very decent (I love the choral backgrounds). Better than the typical SRPG music such as found in Cross Edge/Agarest.

Story

Nothing fancy. I liked it, but it was your run of the mill going-to-the-dungeon-to-prevent-evil-dude-from-releasing-the-seal sort of deal. The characters are at least memorable. Except the main character, and the cat-- no, I mean dog-girl (whatever the hell she is). They're mildly annoying.

The English dub is decent; the voice actors sound familiar (Wendee Lee? Hmmm...). The problem is that the story is kinda weird and would probably be better read as text rather than heard in spoken voice. If only they kept Japanese audio it would have felt much better, if only because we won't be able to tell how awkward the scenes were. It will also meld nicely with the J-pop tunes of a few surprise boss battles. Despite some cheesy / corny scenes, it does get dramatic in the end, as I was surprised with the sudden onset of a symphony orchestra during the climax and closing arc.

Features

For this short JRPG, I counted the explorable dungeons and they're about 10 of them, all linked via portal to a central hub so you won't have to walk back and forth. (The 11th and 12th portal mirrors just lead to the endgame boss and extra arenas, not really dungeons like the rest). There are no towns in the literal sense where you buy and sell stuff.

The overall balance of the game -- it's challenging (or frustrating) in the beginning and middle, but near the end things become ridiculously easy. Like for example I had 300 keys to open chests... at level 49 I had 52,000 HP and I can deal 100,000 HP worth of damage.

Be warned about 'Tower of Freya' though -- it took me some time to figure out, but basically to go through this you need to collect all the hidden treasure chests from the other dungeons. It was frustrating in the amount of back-n-forth I had to do.

I only encountered one bug during the game and that was when I was ambushed one after another when the battle music failed to play. Other than that, it was a flawless, installation-free playtime. Except that the loading screens were a bit long even when they just needed to show a few visual novel cutscenes. I loved the trophy names -- they have a sense of humor catered towards otaku. Sadly, there is no New Game+.

Conclusion

The story itself doesn't stand on its own. The battle system is very unique for a turn-based system. The question is, is it a memorable RPG that's worth playing?

Yes, it is. The whole is worth more than the sum of its parts, so even though each portion is flawed, the game provides a cohesive experience unlike any other. Many JRPGs dabble in providing an assortment of environments that somehow feel tacked on (e.g. the feudal Japan locale in Enchanted Arms). Most other RPGs such as Western ones stick to conventional J.R.R. Tolkien high fantasy. Last Rebellion, despite the comparatively bad 3D graphics, manages to provide a unique fantasy world to experience. You just need to be a JRPG veteran to look beyond its apparent non-AAA quality and enjoy it for the unique take it offers the genre.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:56 pm
by perrandy
Booger wrote:My non-professional review of Last Rebellion

This game is short for a JRPG. I took my time exploring (and doing my laundry) and the entire game only took me 20 hours or 2 sittings. I expected at least 36-40 hours. So the short length is only acceptable if it were a homemade or handheld RPG, which it isn't.

Battle System

From the youtube links it looks clunky, but in actuality it gave me Persona 4 vibes. The whole point of the battle is to maximize your critical attacks. There's nothing more rewarding than seeing five enemies get simultaneously knocked down within 2 turns.

The problem I foresee is that getting that 'pwnage' status requires a lot of trial and error and randomness. Instead of just testing what the enemy's elemental weakness is, in addition you also have to find out what sequence of body parts you have to attack to inflict the maximum damage. Once you get over that (and it could be aggravating at first), the sequence is essentially 'memorized' after you get it right so you just need to follow the prompts the next time you encounter the same enemy. There are no Easy, Medium, Hard modes.

Party System

The party is just two characters that switch back and forth from male to female (kinda like the Birdy anime). While in the field, HP and MP healing is fast, depending on whether you chose female or male. So there is no worry at all about not having a reserve party member with full HP to switch to like you see in other JRPGs.

The limiting factor would be the CP, or Command Points. There are green CP replenishment stations which you can hit to fill up your CP gauge (especially before a boss battle), but while traversing long distances and encountering enemies you tend to run out; that is exactly why you want to maximize your critical hits so you can win the battle in as few turns as possible. During battle, a little CP is replenished; you can also perform the equivalent of "Focus" (for those of you familiar with Skies of Arcadia) to further increase your CP next turn.

The same HP, MP, and CP are shared by the two characters which you switch to and fro. Rather than "1 vs 1", it is more like "2 vs 1-5" and there is a lot of freedom in choosing the order of commands so in the end you don't really feel restricted in only having control of only 2 people. That's because choosing commands is a checkbox system - instead of one command/one attack it is multiple commands/multiple attacks. Just be careful you don't hit 'O' (or 'X' in US PS3s) accidentally since that will cut short your turn.

Levelling

With only one set of stats, this is pretty easy. There's a standard levelling system in addition to extra points you can distribute at your discretion. But what is particularly brilliant is that the extra points used to power up your skills and magic is not permanent! For example, you decide that you want your Fire attack to be stronger and don't need your Heal magic to be that powerful anymore... easy, you remove the point from your Heal magic and add it to your Fire magic.

Graphics

It's late PS2 level graphics. For a better comparison, imagine Enchanted Arms without HDR lighting, that's how basic it is. But what makes it look low-poly is the cel-shading (kind of like
Torchlight in netbook mode). I zoomed in on the character models, and -- besides seeing panties -- the faces were actually nicely detailed, so it isn't the models themselves. The cel-shading just makes things look more jagged than they are. But when supplemented by watercolor sprites, they look consistent enough.

The cutscenes are done in purely visual novel style, which I like. There are a lot of splitscreen event CGs although you probably won't be able to view them in a gallery. The graphic style of the sprites looks more Korean than Japanese - the soft shading, smaller eyes, etc. But I still like what I see.

Environment

It's pretty decent. It's not boring at all, since each area or dungeon is small and compact. Unfortunately, the disc loading screen appears when you switch areas (this game has no option for installation and doesn't require it). It's not a medieval environment, but more like those quasi-Aztec semi-desolate landscapes (the whole religious motif reminded me of the anime Haibane Renmei). The landscape won't win any awards, but it's definitely consistent with the theme of the game.

One gripe I have is that the enemies respawn too quickly. If you don't move, you end up bumping into them again. Also, they are very fast and can chase you halfway across the map. What's worse, they can still be 2 meters away from you when the battle screen starts. Thankfully the 'Surprised' or 'Pre-emptive' modes don't occur too often, but I've noticed some automatic counter-attacks during the actual battles.

Every item in the game is dependent on treasure chests -- whether learning new spells, obtaining keys, accessories, power-ups. Some disappear upon opening, others you can open multiple times. But you need to have keys to open the chests, after which the keys are consumed. Then you need to defeat more monsters to obtain more keys. It was quite frustrating for me during the time I didn't have enough keys to open a chest so I had to kill more monsters then I really needed.

The only NPCs you see are the same hooded entities who only exist to give you hints -- they are scattered throughout the world. They don't give quests or anything. So the whole place seems desolate (dead), but unlike what other people think I really do prefer this lonely atmosphere, since the setting is the remains of a country torn apart by civil war. The level / dungeon designs are really good. They're not the prettiest, but they were more satisfying and less frustrating compared to say, Eternal Sonata. I think the designers knew the limited scope of the game so they designed a nice tight-fitting world with no excess. It's in stark contrast with the wasteful designs of typical MMORPG dungeons.

Sound

Music is sparse, more like ambient sounds. But the few tracks such as title menu and battle music are very decent (I love the choral backgrounds). Better than the typical SRPG music such as found in Cross Edge/Agarest.

Story

Nothing fancy. I liked it, but it was your run of the mill going-to-the-dungeon-to-prevent-evil-dude-from-releasing-the-seal sort of deal. The characters are at least memorable. Except the main character, and the cat-- no, I mean dog-girl (whatever the hell she is). They're mildly annoying.

The English dub is decent; the voice actors sound familiar (Wendee Lee? Hmmm...). The problem is that the story is kinda weird and would probably be better read as text rather than heard in spoken voice. If only they kept Japanese audio it would have felt much better, if only because we won't be able to tell how awkward the scenes were. It will also meld nicely with the J-pop tunes of a few surprise boss battles. Despite some cheesy / corny scenes, it does get dramatic in the end, as I was surprised with the sudden onset of a symphony orchestra during the climax and closing arc.

Features

For this short JRPG, I counted the explorable dungeons and they're about 10 of them, all linked via portal to a central hub so you won't have to walk back and forth. (The 11th and 12th portal mirrors just lead to the endgame boss and extra arenas, not really dungeons like the rest). There are no towns in the literal sense where you buy and sell stuff.

The overall balance of the game -- it's challenging (or frustrating) in the beginning and middle, but near the end things become ridiculously easy. Like for example I had 300 keys to open chests... at level 49 I had 52,000 HP and I can deal 100,000 HP worth of damage.

Be warned about 'Tower of Freya' though -- it took me some time to figure out, but basically to go through this you need to collect all the hidden treasure chests from the other dungeons. It was frustrating in the amount of back-n-forth I had to do.

I only encountered one bug during the game and that was when I was ambushed one after another when the battle music failed to play. Other than that, it was a flawless, installation-free playtime. Except that the loading screens were a bit long even when they just needed to show a few visual novel cutscenes. I loved the trophy names -- they have a sense of humor catered towards otaku. Sadly, there is no New Game+.

Conclusion

The story itself doesn't stand on its own. The battle system is very unique for a turn-based system. The question is, is it a memorable RPG that's worth playing?

Yes, it is. The whole is worth more than the sum of its parts, so even though each portion is flawed, the game provides a cohesive experience unlike any other. Many JRPGs dabble in providing an assortment of environments that somehow feel tacked on (e.g. the feudal Japan locale in Enchanted Arms). Most other RPGs such as Western ones stick to conventional J.R.R. Tolkien high fantasy. Last Rebellion, despite the comparatively bad 3D graphics, manages to provide a unique fantasy world to experience. You just need to be a JRPG veteran to look beyond its apparent non-AAA quality and enjoy it for the unique take it offers the genre.


nice review nothing to add or to substract from it. the game is not great by any means but that doesnt mean that its unplayable or anything :)

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:44 pm
by DanteT
Hey guys, i just bought this game the other day but im finding it hard in battles im like 2 hours in and im level 4. is there a good strategy to use in battles to make it easier for me or what level should i grind tell i go to that first boss? Thanks. i keep dieing the enemy's are really hard for me.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:44 am
by Booger
DanteT wrote:Hey guys, i just bought this game the other day but im finding it hard in battles im like 2 hours in and im level 4. is there a good strategy to use in battles to make it easier for me or what level should i grind tell i go to that first boss? Thanks. i keep dieing the enemy's are really hard for me.


Keep your HP up as often as possible. All it takes to die is to lose a couple of turns by being stunned / paralyzed / falling asleep, etc. That's one disadvantage of the 2-in-1 party system (in other JRPGs, you usually have a healthy character to heal everyone else). That's why it's important to never get your health too low.

You also need to be able to master the critical attack sequence system. What I would do at the beginning of a battle is to randomly spam sequences using every possibility. Then when I see 'BINGO' and the subsequent sequence number, I can at least narrow down the remaining choices. I make sure to at least master the critical sequence for each monster -- usually all it takes is one peruse-through each dungeon fighting each encounter at least once.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 10:52 am
by DanteT
thanks for the help, i think im getting the hang of it now.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 8:08 pm
by idofgrahf
The trick to Last Rebellion is not stamp magic, critical or even who does the attacking. The trick to the game is to make sure you attack the enemies body parts in the RIGHT order. once you find out the order in which you need to attack their body parts, you rack up bonus with a max of 999, this converts to bonus EXP at the end of the battle. The bonus exp of a 999 is many times that of the normal exp of an enemy. I was able to level up every two to three battles in any given area for a while (until my level for exceeded the enemies in which case they give like 10 exp). Here is the trick. There is a support magic that will recharge your chain points. Set that to max, use it when you need to. Set both Ashe and Nine to attack physically until you learn the right order, then just pound away with physical until your bonus max out, then finish them however you like. at the end, absorb them for MP and seal for HP, repeat the process. In 10 hours that it took me to beat the game, I was at level 50 and beat the boss in less than 7 minutes using this technique. Its a bit hard at the start since you don't have as much chain points in the lower levels, once you gain a few levels, it works very well. Hope it helps.

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 11:33 am
by bull422
I'm not exactly passing on this game but I will probably wait a few months (when it might drop in price) before I even consider buying it. ;)

Re: Is anyone looking forward to this game?

Posted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:29 am
by Aeneid
I'm done with it.

I got a Platinum. ^^

... And damn, I wish for a sequel. ._____.